Category: Components

Good, robust, electrical contacts in clothes is still a real challenge, particularly for items integrated into garments. However, we may be a step closer to a solution as Japanese aviation have developed a new thin elastic connector that should survive the regular movement experienced by clothes. (more…)

Conductive tattoos – skin deep electronics

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Conductive tattoos open up the possibility to have electronics directly on your skin, including items such as: input devices or RFID antennas. This is the work of Cindy Kao, an MIT PhD student working together with Microsoft research. (more…)

Pressure sensing textile from LG

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A lack of robust textile sensors and electronic components has held up the advance of electronic garments. LG are attempting to fill the gap, with a textile pressure sensor. (more…)

Embroidered antennas promise improved reception

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Various fabric antennas for incorporation in garments have been around since 2000 (early example). The topic has been revisited by scientists at Ohio State University who can use high precision embroidery to generate antennas in the microwave frequency. (more…)

Shape changing films – Unimorph

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Controllable movement within a textile or garment has been more aspiration than reality in past years. However, a team at MIT have developed simple shape changing films that is certainly a step along the way. (more…)

A fresh view on wearables history

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Did you know the first example of garments containing lights gives back over one hundred years to 1884? I didn’t. This and lots of other intriguing and well researched material is in a great article on the history of wearables by Laurenti de’ Medici (more…)

Almost all you need to know about integrating sensors in clothes

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There are now a wealth of sensors that can be integrated into garments, with the potential to turn your clothes into monitoring platforms or all the way through to smart attire. To help those intrepid enough to embark on such an adventure there is an excellent article from Kate Hartman on Make, that is both comprehensive and accessible. (more…)

Fabric exosuit could make trekking a breeze

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When we think of an exoskeleton we usually think of rigid frameworks with hydraulic joints. Well a team at Harvard’s Wyss Institute have attempted to make a soft exoskeleton through the use of fabric. (more…)

The future of wearable technologies

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Danielle Wilde works on smart textiles at RMIT university in Melbourne, in a short videos she expresses a number of thoughts on where things are heading. Suzanne Lee’s bioculture research and Helen Storey’s exquisite glass dress both get a mention. (more…)